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Glitchspace

Interested in mixing programming skills with first person gaming? If so, Glitchspace could be the perfect game. The game features a node-based programming system called Null, which allows for chunks of functionality to be applied to objects with ease, and makes the programming a visual, dynamic, and instantaneous feature.

The game passed its Steam Greenlight campaign last month and is currently available to buy in beta format for PC, Mac and Linux.

Set in a cyberspace world, you are trying to find a place known as Glitchspace – a by-product of cyberspace and its various glitches. A world that would allow for infinite possibilities, and access across all systems in cyberspace through exploitation. Through problem solving, it’s up to you how you approach the in-game challenges; find glitches in the cyberspace world, and exploit them in various different ways, allowing for a emergent play experience.

 

Programming_And_Gameplay

Objects in Glitchspace are either programmable, or non-programmable. You can make an object programmable through decryption using a decrypter, and similarly you can make it non-programmable through encryption using an encrypter.

For each programmable object, a canvas can be brought up, and function nodes can be added to it upon the canvas. These function nodes have input and output connections, and can be connected to each other to create functional code that does something to the object, to another object it references, or to totally new objects it creates!
Here are some example programs you could make:

  • Apply a force to an object, moving it out of the way.
  • Scale an object down to make it the correct height for jumping on.
  • Duplicate and move an object to create stairs, or floating platforms.
  • Make an object have no collisions to pass through it.
  • Change the physical properties of an object.
  • Make an object move when you touch another object.
  • Replicate the functionality of the Portal, and Gravity gun.

Objects that are decrypted will have a default program applied, and a specific set of function nodes for you to edit the program. This will depend upon the decrypter used. In the sandbox mode, all functions are available to you, allowing you to play around with all that is possible!

Gallery:

 

PC:

  • OS: Windows XP. Vista, 7, 8.
  • Processor: 1.0Ghz Dual Core
  • Memory: 250 MB RAM
  • Graphics: 512MB Video Card, Shader Model 3.0
  • DirectX: Version 9.0c
  • Hard Drive: 150 MB available space

Mac:

  • OS: An Intel-based Mac running Mac OS X 10.6
  • Processor: 1.0Ghz Dual Core
  • Memory: 250 MB RAM
  • Graphics: 512MB Video Card, Shader Model 3.0
  • Hard Drive: 150 MB available space

Linux:

  • OS: A Debian based Linux distro
  • Processor: 1.0Ghz Dual Core
  • Memory: 250 MB RAM
  • Graphics: 512MB Video Card, Shader Model 3.0
  • Hard Drive: 150 MB available space